Animals are amazing creatures and have a lot to teach us! Children can learn about kindness, self-control, love, and responsibility, just to name a few. Some children never have the opportunity to have a pet at home… but maybe they can experience it in their classroom. I’ve never met a person who wasn’t intrigued by a baby animal. In most cases, the anticipation of getting a classroom animal is half the fun. Have the students earn it! 1) Make it part of your reading program - Have each student find one sponsor who would be willing to donate a set amount of money for each grade level book he/she reads (somewhere between 0.10¢ and $1.00). Show students how to keep a log so they can track what they’ve read (and what they’ve been paid for). Designate a day of the week for students to bring in their money (Mondays and Fridays work well). Practice math skills by having the class utilize counting, adding, or graphing to keep track of their funds. Once the class has reached their goal; make a phone call to Recycled Earth to arrange for your animal’s delivery!  2) Create a class culture – Choose a character trait that you want your class to emulate; some ideas are kindness, self-control, and honesty. Explain that the students have the opportunity to earn a classroom animal. Each time they demonstrate the target behavior, add a piece of the animal’s habitat; I recommend placing the bottom of the cage as a starting point (an “I believe you can do this” statement), as the process is explained. Some teachers may choose to have all the pieces visible on Day 1, other teachers may pull the pieces out as needed. Once the entire habitat (i.e. cage and equipment) has been put together, the class will be ready for their animal! (Reminder: In this case the classroom teacher or a sponsor will be responsible for funding) Here is a list of animals you could potentially experience in your classroom: Classroom Rabbit/Bunny: Bunnies and rabbits are good listeners and great noise indicators! Our pilot class of 1st graders learned that their bunny would hide when they were too loud. It only took the students 2 days to start telling their classmates they needed to be quieter because the bunny was hiding! They also learned all about rabbits and their natural habitats, what their bunny liked to snack on, and how to properly handle and care for their bunny. +Incubator Program: Start with 9 eggs and watch the chicks hatch; all in just 21 days! The start date of the incubator program is carefully calculated to maximize the amount of time the chicks hatch on a school day. The incubator program is not recommended during months with long school breaks, or during months that are famous for snow days. If you are a technologically savvy teacher, you may try creating a “chick web cam” that attaches to your school web page, so your students can check in on their eggs/chicks over the weekends. +Classroom Chicks: Who doesn’t love a fluffy chick? Chicks are a good way for children to experience a farm animal in their most non-threatening form. Classrooms will receive 3-6 chicks, depending on availability and timing. Chicks (like most farm animals) do better when they can be with other chicks. Witness their accelerated growth rate. Have your class chart their growth by qualitative and quantitative data. You will see a difference within a week, but the change is more obvious over a month, especially for younger children.  If the chicks will be left in the building overnight, a principal or school superintendent needs to sign a written document stating that a heat lamp can be left on 24/7 throughout the rental period. Otherwise chicks and their equipment will need to go home with the teacher each night. +One caveat: Recycled Earth does its best to raise healthy animals; however nature is a cruel teacher and not every chick will hatch, be born perfectly, and survive to adulthood. Such incidences should be used as teachable moments about; animal survival rates in the wild, baby development, Darwinism, DNA processes, and any other topic you can make a connection with. All rental prices include delivery, set-up, all necessary equipment, food, bedding, a week of grade appropriate lesson plans, care instructions, and your animal(s). The person who signs the contract is responsible for returning all equipment and animals at the end of the rental period. All rabbits/bunnies and chicks (not in the incubator program) need to be taken home on the weekends, and during extended school breaks. Usually the person who signs the contract takes on this responsibility. Students and their families may want this experience. It is recommended that families (and their pets) are screened prior to any arrangement. *Indicates animals can be given to the classroom at the end of the rental agreement. Teachers may opt to raffle the animal(s), keep the animal(s), or give them as a token of excellence to a student who demonstrated an interest and ability in keeping them. Teachers may need to send home a permission slip explaining the program, and asking for parental consent. Generally speaking few people have allergies to the animals in our rental program; especially when students follow safe handling instructions, which recommends washing hands after handling an animal or its bedding. No animals will be rented to a classroom without teacher consent. It is ultimately up to the teacher and the school’s administration as to whether a classroom pet is allowed or not.  
©2017-18
In Your School (or Home)
9
$100.00
Animals are amazing creatures and have a lot to teach us! Children can learn about kindness, self-control, love, and responsibility, just to name a few. Some children never have the opportunity to have a pet at home… but maybe they can experience it in their classroom. I’ve never met a person who wasn’t intrigued by a baby animal. In most cases, the anticipation of getting a classroom animal is half the fun. Have the students earn it! 1) Make it part of your reading program - Have each student find one sponsor who would be willing to donate a set amount of money for each grade level book he/she reads (somewhere between 0.10¢ and $1.00). Show students how to keep a log so they can track what they’ve read (and what they’ve been paid for). Designate a day of the week for students to bring in their money (Mondays and Fridays work well). Practice math skills by having the class utilize counting, adding, or graphing to keep track of their funds. Once the class has reached their goal; make a phone call to Recycled Earth to arrange for your animal’s delivery!  2) Create a class culture – Choose a character trait that you want your class to emulate; some ideas are kindness, self-control, and honesty. Explain that the students have the opportunity to earn a classroom animal. Each time they demonstrate the target behavior, add a piece of the animal’s habitat; I recommend placing the bottom of the cage as a starting point (an “I believe you can do this” statement), as the process is explained. Some teachers may choose to have all the pieces visible on Day 1, other teachers may pull the pieces out as needed. Once the entire habitat (i.e. cage and equipment) has been put together, the class will be ready for their animal! (Reminder: In this case the classroom teacher or a sponsor will be responsible for funding) Here is a list of animals you could potentially experience in your classroom: Classroom Rabbit/Bunny: Bunnies and rabbits are good listeners and great noise indicators! Our pilot class of 1st graders learned that their bunny would hide when they were too loud. It only took the students 2 days to start telling their classmates they needed to be quieter because the bunny was hiding! They also learned all about rabbits and their natural habitats, what their bunny liked to snack on, and how to properly handle and care for their bunny. +Incubator Program: Start with 9 eggs and watch the chicks hatch; all in just 21 days! The start date of the incubator program is carefully calculated to maximize the amount of time the chicks hatch on a school day. The incubator program is not recommended during months with long school breaks, or during months that are famous for snow days. If you are a technologically savvy teacher, you may try creating a “chick web cam” that attaches to your school web page, so your students can check in on their eggs/chicks over the weekends. +Classroom Chicks: Who doesn’t love a fluffy chick? Chicks are a good way for children to experience a farm animal in their most non- threatening form. Classrooms will receive 3-6 chicks, depending on availability and timing. Chicks (like most farm animals) do better when they can be with other chicks. Witness their accelerated growth rate. Have your class chart their growth by qualitative and quantitative data. You will see a difference within a week, but the change is more obvious over a month, especially for younger children. If the chicks will be left in the building overnight, a principal or school superintendent needs to sign a written document stating that a heat lamp can be left on 24/7 throughout the rental period. Otherwise chicks and their equipment will need to go home with the teacher each night. +One caveat: Recycled Earth does its best to raise healthy animals; however nature is a cruel teacher and not every chick will hatch, be born perfectly, and survive to adulthood. Such incidences should be used as teachable moments about; animal survival rates in the wild, baby development, Darwinism, DNA processes, and any other topic you can make a connection with. All rental prices include delivery, set-up, all necessary equipment, food, bedding, a week of grade appropriate lesson plans, care instructions, and your animal(s). The person who signs the contract is responsible for returning all equipment and animals at the end of the rental period. All rabbits/bunnies and chicks (not in the incubator program) need to be taken home on the weekends, and during extended school breaks. Usually the person who signs the contract takes on this responsibility. Students and their families may want this experience. It is recommended that families (and their pets) are screened prior to any arrangement. *Indicates animals can be given to the classroom at the end of the rental agreement. Teachers may opt to raffle the animal(s), keep the animal(s), or give them as a token of excellence to a student who demonstrated an interest and ability in keeping them. Teachers may need to send home a permission slip explaining the program, and asking for parental consent. Generally speaking few people have allergies to the animals in our rental program; especially when students follow safe handling instructions, which recommends washing hands after handling an animal or its bedding. No animals will be rented to a classroom without teacher consent. It is ultimately up to the teacher and the school’s administration as to whether a classroom pet is allowed or not.  
©2017-18
In Your School (or Home)
RECYCLED EARTH IN YOUR SCHOOL (OR HOME)
9
$100.00